Thursday, February 7, 2013

J. Press York Street



From Gentleman's Quarterly
So a reader emails me and asks my opinion about the J. Press-Ovadia collaboration called York Street. I had no clue what he was talking about. After snooping about a bit and landing hereI now have an opinion...

The J. Press York Street conflagration smacks of Charlton Heston in the last year of his life...A Stalwart Alpha Legend cum Rodeo Clown. Sad. Really.

Onward. Stalwarts and all.
ADG II

17 comments:

Anonymous said...

Looks to me like you could have added Camel Toe, too...

NCJack said...

When I see clothes like that, all I can think of is "imitation grownup". The ad ought to say "Hey kids, send in five boxtops and $2000 for your own..."etc.

Young Fogey said...

What is the appeal of wearing your little brother's clothes, I wonder?

I can't wait until the Thom Browne fascination with All Things Pee-Wee ends.

Men, start buying stock in Wide Lapels R Us, the nation's biggest supplier of 4"+ lapels. After the boom years of the 1970s, they've gone through some hard times, but they're waiting for their inevitable comeback after we awaken from this collective nightmare so we can move on to the next one.

Scale Worm said...

Boy bands do prep for cash.
ICK!

Anonymous said...

Fogey- have you seen ARGO? The movie, not the laundry starch? Making things look cool in movies is often the first step and they had some aeronatics-grade lapels in that one.
Mr Moderation

Young Fogey said...

Anonymous,

What are these "movies" of which you speak? Are they available for the stereopticon?

Anonymous said...

The problem is this: J.Press needs to attract some new customers, as all of their current clients will be dead or housebound in 20 years. The solution is not: hideously cut, garish clothing meant for teenage nymphs. I am in my mid-twenties and fit. I love Press's designs, but the majority of their tailored clothing is clearly made for fat old executives who started wearing weirdly baggy clothing in the late 80s and never looked back. Meaning that aside from some sweaters and accessories, much of their clothing is unwearable for me.

J.Press should simply make quality clothing cut and designed just like what they sold in the 60s, 70s, early 80s--lean, trim, flattering, but not tight, constricting, and junk-squeezing. I'd buy it! (In fact, I have purchased a number of the very, very, very limited "slim" (reasonable) fit items, and they're great!) The design is there, as is the quality--the cut is just embarrassing. But I'd never purchase anything from York St.

(Much of this comment is plagiarized from another I left on Ivy Style's article on this idiocy. Clearly I am overinvested.)

Anonymous said...

This whole reason about the "older" J. Press customers are dying off and they need to attract a new "younger" customer by creating a whole new line is bogus! Those of us who are in our early 40's will be going into our 50's & 60's buying the same type of clothing. There will be a demand for this classic style.

Remember what happened to Brooks when M&S started to change the look they were known for...

ADG said...

Wow! The comments are funny and provocative. Amazing how visceral some of this stuff becomes. And it further supports my trend of not writing lengthy blog posts.

Anonymous said...

ADG, this indeed is the conversation bubble/cartoon caption internet golden age of snark wherein/whereat a single photo is a call for entries. I agree, nothin but good laughs on this one.

-F

Anonymous said...

The cut of clothes styled in this fashion suggests that perhaps the designers have looked to Chico Marx for inspiration.

Anonymous said...

Big article in the NY Times about the Thom today.

Anonymous said...

I always love your light-hearted blog, but I somehow find the need to defend Charlton Heston (I certainly cannot defend J. Press on this one). Charlton Heston marched with MLK on Washington and gave great weight and gravitas to the Civil Rights movement when most Hollywood stars were scared to death of being blacklisted as a troublemaker, or far worse monikers. To me, that alone absolves him from any silliness caused primarily by a completely unscrupulous documentary maker who misled Heston while he was suffering from Alzheimers. It is kind of like the jokes about Admiral Stockdale, after he made the poor choice of being associated with Perot's campaign after the most exemplary life of service to our country. I think some people just deserve for us to look the other way in their old-age kookiness. Of course, perhaps that is what you were getting at with Press.

Ian from Downunder said...

By heck! Talk about foolin around with a hornets' nest.

I have only been to your wonderful country on 2 occasions, the 3rd will take place this September. In 2005, I saw snow for the first time in Boston, I walked through the grounds of Harvard where I experienced my first snowfall and then I walked / slided all the way to J Press. Ah treasured memories. I could not believe my eyes when I saw the J Press ad.
I'm an old pipe smoking poop that fell in love with good old tweedy, flannel loving Boston.
C'mon, give it back!!
Regards to my fellow ADG followers.

Anonymous said...

Wait till you view the hipster goat idiots that frequent this joint: http://www.flickr.com/photos/paulandwilliams/sets/72157632983604069/

Anonymous said...

I see from the GQ article that they are planning to sell this stuff at Unionmade here in SF. They have some nice things on their site but when you go to their store in person, you can tell by the goofy bearded urban lumberjacks who greet you that they are a trendy streetwear shop.
J. Press should be going after the young professionals who now are more likely to buy Italian (Zegna, etc.) rather than play the streetwear game.

Anonymous said...

Looks like something that that handsome Unabashedly Prep guy would wear.

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