Thursday, April 28, 2011

Apparel Arts Spring Advance Winter 1935

12 comments:

Main Line Sportsman said...

Love the Fellowes artwork.
How about them ski-knickers and double breated "tunic" (?)

T said...

Where in hell does one GET things like this? I realize it's probably a secret source, and don't expect you divulge anything, just more amazed at your skill in acquisition. I'm not gonna say "you da man," don't worry.

Oh wait.

Rittenhouse Custom Clothiers said...

Simply Exquisite!!!! The Tuxedo pictures are awesome.

Mrs. Blandings said...

I know you are seeing clothes here, but all I see are color schemes for rooms.

ilovelimegreen said...

Are those real fabric swatches or am I seeing things?

NCJack said...

Harumppph...don't know that I should talk to you after you dressed Princess Lily in..."well curated" accessories...but, man, those illustrations are amazing! Just the fuzzy variety of socks alone. Wonder if even then men mixed patterns and colors like that? You sure don't see it today in grown-up (i.e., non-Thom Browne/hipster/Sartorialist) apparel.

Britt Sudduth said...

D.

Wonderful books! Sometimes I really feel like I should have been born in another era.

Britt

David V said...

And not a baseball cap insight.

David V said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Flo said...

"And not a baseball cap insight."

I know one guy wearing a ball cap during Spring of 1935, that would be my Dad, he's wearing it out in the sun somewhere on a New Jersey turnpike digging ditches, he's fresh out of Yale having distinguished himself academically and athletically but unable to find work unless it's with a shovel, so he took up the shovel and sent his wages home to his parents, had to turn down an invitation to play for the Yankees so he could help support his parents. The Depression is full of stories like mine, it makes me wonder to whom is Apparel Arts speaking with these marvelous displays, the fully insulated of Palm Beach and Long Island I suppose.

David V said...

Flo: "Designers" have only recently discovered that they can copy men's work wear and resell it at high prices.

Young Fogey said...

Flo,

The Great Depression, exacerbated by FDR's hare-brained policies, saw an unemployment rate of about 25%. That's only a little higher than our current unemployment rate--at least according to Shadow Government Statistics (http://www.shadowstats.com/). In any case, while times were tough for many people, not everyone was out of work, and even men who had to tighten their belts still dressed like adults, rather than the "high-school locker room escapee" look that is all the rage today. Apparel Arts was based on what real-live men actually wore, which is, as you know, the polar opposite of modern "fashion."

So yeah, as hard as it is to believe, at least some men did dress like that, though I couldn't give you numbers.

And I'm sorry your father didn't get to play for the Yankees. Still, how wonderful to have had such an honorable and decent man as a father!

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